• Below the Fold? Not That Simple!

    Post by Backa Montereo: You should try to have a site that has almost all of the content above the fold. That is the general rule that all marketers say to clients and friends alike, they say this perhaps at a rate of regularity that it feels like the Rosetta Stone has been found once again. It hasn't. So, why do we all still talk about this? Well, it seems that there is a growing swell of people suggesting that this is – in fact – a myth.To a degree.

    The issue isn’t whether the call to action is visible when your prospect first arrives. The issue is whether your call to action is visible at the point where your prospect has become convinced to take action.” D Bnonn Tennant

    Originally coming from newspapers this term hints at content further up the page being the most read and needs to be the snappiest and indeed where the big news articles would be placed. Pinterest, Facebook, Mashable, Twitter, BBC News, Daily Mail all have content that is below the fold. You may say “yeah, but these are not eCommerce sites!” and that is true (bar Pinterest and others to a point).

    What Do Others Do?
    Ok, so let’s look at some ecommerce sites one of which is inspired by a post from taylorswebsites.com and the other from our own general observation.

    Carphone Warehouse – Key business CTA’s below the fold
    This site has a large hero banner for the most vital business action. It has a range of content below the fold such as promotions and more. Content below the fold includes their best-selling pay monthly deals and PAYG deals.

    Amazon – CTA’s based on your preference below the fold
    The selling platform that really owns this space has much of the content on the homepage below the fold. Some of this content has high value and provides better sales prospects such as the “Related to Items You've Viewed” and “Inspired by Your Browsing History”.This is a starting point and in no way are we saying that this is the way forward. We are not.

    What we are saying is that you should take learning’s from your data sources to see what works and what does not. Don’t just go by what you hear in the funky office as you play Wii U on the client’s time. You need to think:

    What content should go above the fold and why?
    Do I need social icons above the fold?
    Where should I place my key CTA’s?
    What is the goal of this page?

    Look at Others
    If you look at code.org (read more about that in our post here) every page has their key CTA at the bottom of the site in the footer as well as sometimes above the fold, a neat solution to this area of website design. 

    Free Online Tools
    A great tool to help start is Google’s own Browser Size analysis tool in Google Analytics, under the In-Page Analytics report. The tool shades the portions of a page that are “below the fold,” and shows you what percentage of users are seeing how much of the page. Other free online tools such as Fivesecondtest helps you fine tune your landing pages and calls to action by analysing the most prominent elements of your design. From this you can learn what CTA’s are working well and what ones are not performing. We will end this post be pasting the quote above by D Bnonn Tennant again and show a fun video that takes a silly look at people who think they know what they are talking about but, perhaps, do not know that much

    The issue isn’t whether the call to action is visible when your prospect first arrives. The issue is whether your call to action is visible at the point where your prospect has become convinced to take action.” D Bnonn Tennant

    So that’s it, while you are hanging out and talking with work buddies, ask the question “what do you think about web site design and being above the fold?” and see what they say! We suggest you make a few notes from this article for back up!